Movies could replace anaesthetic for child radiotherapy

Children with cancer could be spared dozens of doses of general anaesthesia by projecting a video directly on to the inside of a radiotherapy machine during treatment | OnMedica

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The new research was presented this week at the ESTRO 36 conference (European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology), taking place in Vienna, Austria.

Catia Aguas, a radiation therapist and dosimetrist at the Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels, Belgium, told the conference that using video instead of general anaesthesia is less traumatic for children and their families, as well as making each treatment quicker and more cost effective.

The study included 12 children aged between one and a half and six years old who were treated with radiotherapy using a Tomotherapy® treatment unit at the university hospital. Six were treated before a video projector was installed in 2014 and six were treated after.

Before the video was available, general anaesthesia was needed for 83% of children’s treatments. Once the projector was installed, anaesthesia was only needed in 33% of treatments.

Read the full commentary here

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Nurses’ experiences of pain management for people with advanced dementia approaching the end of life

De Witt Jansen, B. et al. (2017) Journal of Clinical Nursing. 26(9-10) pp. 1234–1244

Aims and objectives: To explore hospice, acute care and nursing home nurses’ experiences of pain management for people with advanced dementia in the final month of life. To identify the challenges, facilitators and practice areas requiring further support.

Background: Pain management in end-stage dementia is a fundamental aspect of end-of-life care; however, it is unclear what challenges and facilitators nurses experience in practice, whether these differ across care settings, and whether training needs to be tailored to the context of care.

Conclusions: Achieving pain management in practice was highly challenging. A number of barriers were identified; however, the manner and extent to which these impacted on nurses differed across hospice, nursing home and acute care settings. Needs-based training to support and promote practice development in pain management in end-stage dementia is required.

Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses considered pain management fundamental to end-of-life care provision; however, nurses working in acute care and nursing home settings may be undersupported and under-resourced to adequately manage pain in people dying with advanced dementia. Nurse-to-nurse mentoring and ongoing needs-assessed interactive case-based learning could help promote practice development in this area. Nurses require continuing professional development in pharmacology.

Read the abstract here

Using Technology to Reduce Childrens’ Anxiety Throughout the Perioperative Period

Goldschmidt, K. & Woolley, A. Journal of Pediatric Nursing | Published online: 27 April 2017

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In the U.S. each year, approximately 5 million children undergo a surgical procedure (Perry, Hooper, & Masiongale, 2012). Surgery is one of the most stressful medical procedures that a child can experience. In fact, approximately 50% of children are reported to experience significant anxiety in the preoperative period (Perry et al., 2012). Pediatric nurses know the importance of incorporating parents into the child’s plan of care and understand that the child is comforted by the presence of someone that they know and love.

Read the abstract here

Perioperative interventions for the reduction of chronic postsurgical pain

Nikolajsen, L. (20170 Pain. 158(5) pp.769–770

In this issue of PAIN, Martinez and co-workers publish a systemic review with a meta-analysis of randomized trials on the effect of perioperative pregabalin for the prevention of chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP).12 The primary outcome was CPSP after 3 months. Secondary outcomes included CPSP after 6 and 12 months and CPSP with a neuropathic pain component (CPSPNP) after 3, 6, and 12 months. The review comprises 18 studies, of which only 15 studies presented data on the primary outcome. Nine of the 15 studies, accounting for 1492 out of 1884 patients (79%), were unpublished and mainly identified through registry searches and personal communication with the authors. Martinez et al. conclude that there is no evidence to support the use of perioperative pregabalin for the reduction of CPSP. The quality of evidence for reduction of CPSPNP was too low to make any recommendations.

Read the full analysis here

The original research article is available to download here

Quality Improvement Program Reduces Respiratory-Related Events

According to data presented at the 2017 annual meeting of the Society for Technology in Anesthesia, implementation of a hospital-based quality improvement program (QIP) was shown to reduce respiratory-related events after only one year | Clinical Anesthesiology

Although the program did not lead to changes in PSI-11 (Patient Safety Indicator 11), ICU transfers or mortality, continuous monitoring with capnography and pulse oximetry was associated with reductions in postoperative respiratory failure, cardiac arrest/resuscitation events and length of stay from a respiratory event.

“We implemented this program because it was the right thing to do for our patients,” said Christine O’Farrell, BSN, CPHQ, CPHRM, director of quality management for Barton Healthcare, in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., “but these data suggest that continuous monitoring with both capnography and pulse oximetry may improve quality by reducing severe respiratory adverse events and length of stay for high-risk patients.”

Read the full overview here

Parents’ reactions can lessen or worsen pain for injured kids

New research (yet to be published) has looked at family coping and distress during a dressing change following a burn injury in kids | The Conversation

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The 18-month study observed 92 families during their young child’s (one to six years) first burn dressing change at a Brisbane hospital.

Parents who reported they were more anxious or distressed were less able to support their child during the procedure. This decreased the child’s ability to cope and increased the child’s distress, which was measured by their ability to be distracted by toys and conversation, compared to crying or screaming during the dressing change.

Ratings of child anxiety and pain during the dressing change were also greater for children of parents who were less able to support their child during the dressing change.

Read the full blog post by  Erin Brown & Justin Kenardy here

Background noise lowers the performance of anaesthesiology residents’ clinical reasoning

Enser, M. et al. European Journal of Anaesthesiology | Published online: 7 April 2017

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Background: Noise, which is omnipresent in operating rooms and ICUs, may have a negative impact not only patients but also on the concentration of and communication between clinical staff.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that noise affects clinical reasoning of anaesthesiology residents especially junior residents when measured by SCT. This observation supports the hypothesis that noise should be prevented in operating rooms especially when junior residents are providing care.

Read the full article here